Kid Approved & Diabetic Friendly

10 Back-to-School with Diabetes Tips

10 Back-to-School with Diabetes Tips

It’s that time of year. Whether you are 1) the parent of a newly diagnosed school-aged child, 2) your child was diagnosed very early on in life but this is their first school experience, or 3) you’ve already sent your type 1 child to school before, but are heading into a new school year- back-to-school can be a very stressful time. But, it doesn’t have to be!

I believe there are 3 components to a creating a good relationship with the school and personnel that will be helping your child manage their diabetes while at school: preparation, education and communication. This post will help you lay the groundwork to achieve these 3 things.

There were of course so many things I thought about after we received C’s diagnosis just shy of his 2nd birthday, but even way back then, one of the biggest hurdles of all to me was the thought of sending him to school. I was a stay-at-home mom, so school was the first time I would be entrusting him in the care of someone else. There were so many times I asked myself how on earth I was going to be able to let someone else manage his diabetes. Even though in so many ways that seems like it was a lifetime ago, the fear and worry I had about sending him to school remains seared in my memory today. We were able to slowly ease into it, with preschool and other small functions he was involved in that forced us to loosen our grip (sports, camps, etc.), but quite honestly sending him off to Kindergarten remains high on my list of hardest things I’ve ever done.

Shipping your kiddo off for the first time is hard no matter what, and adding in a chronic health condition can be enough to send someone into a spiral. However, for you moms that are getting ready to send your type 1 kiddo to school for the first time, I am here to tell you that 5 full school years later, school has been nothing but a positive experience, and we have a great relationship with the school and everyone that cares for him. And the good news is that you can have this too! Here’s how:

Contact the School: If this is your first year sending them to school, you should start by contacting the school and letting them know your type 1 child will be starting there. Ideally, you would have made this call in the spring before they start school (Kindergarten roundup is a good time to have this conversation), just so that it can be taken into consideration when they’re figuring out class placement, etc. During that call you can get a feel for who will primarily be in charge of your child’s diabetes management. It seems that this widely varies from school to school. At my son’s school his teacher has really only been in charge of helping him remember when to go down to the office for his scheduled blood sugar checks, and to know what to look for if he seems to be acting “off.” While the teachers have for sure been a very important component to his care, all of his actual treatment happens in the nurse’s office. The nurse and the school secretaries (only if the nurse is not there) are the only ones that oversee him checking his blood sugar, operating his pump, or give him a snack or juice when he is low. I remember it worried me at first when I heard the teacher’s would have such little involvement, but the whole setup has really worked for us. And now that we’ve done this a few times, I realize teachers have enough to worry about with a classroom full of kids, probably many of whom also need special care of some sort. Putting them in charge of the bulk of diabetes management might prove to be way too much for one person. We have the added benefit that one of C’s secretaries has a type 1 child (grown) of her own. I imagine there are a lot of other people out there who will find that someone at the school has a diabetes connection that you can also lean on, as well. But if not, have no fear, because good communication will solve everything.

Contact Your Diabetes Care Team: At your next endocrinologist appointment ask your diabetes management team to help create a medical management plan. This is basically just doctor orders outlining diabetes management information specific to your child. You can get more detailed within your 504 plan, but this is a good place to start. Bring this paper with you when you meet with the school.

Set up a Meeting: When C started Kindergarten we touched base with the school in the spring and they answered a lot of basic questions for us. Honestly, just making that first call started to ease a lot of my fears, and just helped me to get a nice picture of just how everything would work in a day. Don’t wait to make this call, as it can be very difficult to reach the individuals you need if it’s the middle of summer. 

Now in subsequent years, I like to reach out about a week before school starts. Any sooner than this and teacher’s are still enjoying summer break themselves, and in our case, class placement information is still unknown. You also want the information to be fresh in their minds, so meeting as close to the start of the new year is ideal, IMO.

Create a 504 Plan: In addition to you medical management plan, you will likely want to create a 504 plan. In short, this is essentially a very detailed plan of how your child’s diabetes will be managed while at school. Having a 504 plan in place requires that your child have the same access to education as other children.

Here is a great link to sample 504 plans by age/insulin regimen (for kids using injections and pumps): childrenwithdiabetes.com. This post also has a lot of great things to consider adding to your 504 plan: d-mom.com.

Create a Supply Box: I recommend purchasing a medium sized plastic tote with a lid. On the outside of the box put a current photo of your child, your child’s name and two phone numbers where you can be reached the quickest. Your box should contain anything your child may need to manage diabetes for the day. This forum  has a great list of things you may want to include in your supply box: forums.childrenwithdiabetes.com. Your boxes contents will vary depending on if your child does injections of if they are on an insulin pump, etc. This is what we have in C’s box:

  • Juice boxes- we include two sizes of juice boxes and give parameters for when to give which one. The big ones are only used to treat severe lows.
  • Glucose tabs- we like GlucoLift.
  • Snacks –  we built a snack into C’s morning because he has P.E. and recess in the morning and eats about an hour later than he has in previous years. This small snacks helps stabilize blood sugar and prevent lows. Of course if his blood sugar is high, we skip snack for that day. The main snack I send is bars. RXBAR Kids, KIND Minis, Quest bars, and Lara Bars are C’s favorites. Here are some other school snack ideas: 20 Carb Snack Packs.
  • Blood glucose meter
  • Testing strips
  • Lancets
  • Glucagon Kit
  • Ketostix

Meet with School Staff: When we meet with the school we typically meet with the nurse and C’s new teacher for the year. Ask that anyone who will be caring for your child during a typical day be at this meeting. We have always brought C with us to these meetings. We feel it’s important to get him on the same page and voice any questions or concerns he has as we talk through everything.

Start by going over your 504 plan and this will cover most of what needs to be discussed, or will at least prompt discussion of most topics. Go over everything in your supply box and explain what each item is (especially if this is their first experience with diabetes). Demonstrate how to use their blood glucose meter, administer injections or operate the pump, and how to use the glucagon kit. Cheat sheets for how to operate the pump may be helpful when they’re starting out. Depending on the brand of pump you use, you may be able to find printables of the most common pump functions (correcting a high, or giving a food bolus) on their particular company’s website.

If this is the first time your child is going to school this meeting will be pretty long. If it’s not your first rodeo this meeting will basically just be meeting with your child’s new teacher and just re-hashing the plan from the previous year and catching everyone up to speed on any changes that have been made (if any) over the summer.

Make sure you leave the meeting feeling like you have addressed all of your thoughts/concerns. You will likely get home and realize there was something you forgot to mention (if you’re like me). Don’t hesitate to reach back out.

Talk with Your Child: After your meeting with staff, again go over the key points that your child will need to know and be in charge of during their day. I think sometimes this component can almost get missed. Even if your child is with you at the initial meeting, there is sometimes a lot of back and forth conversation regarding how you want certain situations handled, and it can become unclear to a child what is their responsibility vs. the school’s responsibility. Be sure your child is clear on what is expected of them.

And if you’re like me, you might have some conflicting feelings about just how much responsibility you want your child to have with diabetes management. There is a fine line between giving them independence and burdening them with too much when they’re also trying to figure out school for the first time. You know your child best so you can gauge what all you want to make them responsible for and what things you want to hold off on.

When C first started school the main thing we stressed was communication. We stressed how important it was to tell his teachers if he felt high or low and how it was going to be important to really pay attention to how he was feeling and if he started feeling low he needed to tell someone and go down to the office and check his blood sugar, even if he wasn’t sure he was low. We went through a period of time where he would get busy playing and I think he would start feeling low but would put off telling us because he didn’t want to stop playing. It seems like such a no-brainer to us adults, but I’d say it’s pretty common for kids to do this. Kind of like when kids put off going to the bathroom until they’re dancing around about ready to pee their pants. Maybe this is just my kids? Anyway…even though this is totally common sense stuff, when a kid is at school and learning about raising his hand to talk and not interrupting others, it can be hard to speak up immediately at times. Diabetes makes it OK to be “rude” sometimes :). Stress to your child that it’s an emergency if he/she feels low and it’s necessary to speak up no matter what.

Talk with Classmates: When C started Kindergarten we had his teacher read the book Taking Diabetes to School to the whole class. Coco Goes Back to School is another good one, especially for younger kids. That gave a watered down version of what diabetes is, and explained that C would have to always go to the nurses office before eating or drinking anything, etc. His teacher also had him show them his pump and stressed that it wasn’t a toy and that no one should ever touch it. This one likely is not be applicable for older kids, but in Kindergarten I remember it being a concern.

Again this is one where you have to know your own child. Some kids may just be embarrassed if you bring it to everyone’s attention. However, I feel like kid’s are naturally curious anytime they see C check his blood sugar, etc. So, if you can do one quick explanation of everything, you can hopefully answer everyone’s questions all at once. C has expressed frustration with people asking questions and them “not understanding his answers anyway,” so this has been pretty effective for us. Now that he’s in his sixth year of school most of the kids know he has diabetes, so he has fewer and fewer questions. In the past we’ve had the nurse come in to the classroom, read the book, and then let the kids ask questions and C answered them.

Make Adjustments if Needed: You will need to make some adjustments to your plan. Even if you get everything right the first time, your child will grow or something in the schedule will change, and something will need to be adjusted with your management plan. Don’t worry about this, just be ready for it.

Get a full week or two under your belt and see how everything is going. Are your scheduled blood sugar checks proving to be at the best times of day? Does there seem to be low or high patterns identified that could be avoidable? If so, talk it over with school personnel and make changes, if necessary. For instance, in our first year of school,  once we had been through a couple of weeks and could see exactly how his blood sugar was trending, we had to adjust his snack time, along with the timing of some regularly scheduled checks. To give a specific example, C would tend to go low before P.E. so we added a check before and after P.E. on those days. Or we took away a check right before dismissal one year because it was proving to not add value since I would be picking him up only minutes later.

But what adjustments should you make, and how do you figure it out? After all, you aren’t seeing them for most of the day. The answer is two-fold. First, keep in contact with the school personnel (which I’ll discuss in detail shortly). Second, establish a system for getting the data you need.

For us this has always been easy, and seems to get easier each year. We have made sure the school always has a meter that links to C’s pump, so all of the blood sugar readings from school are stored in his pump automatically. We can download those numbers from his pump using the diabetes management software of your choice, and start looking for trends in those numbers. Once we got him on a CGM, we could get even more information and download that to use for further analysis. Now, in what feels like a miraculous improvement since day 1, using the Dexcom with Share technology, we can actually see C’s numbers all day long on our iPhones, and we can download the data to our computer at any time as well (and Dexcom’s software makes analysis a breeze). So, we get a glimpse into his blood sugar in real-time and also can make decisions with all of the data possible with little effort.

Of course, I realize that there are infinite ways to handle diabetes management, and not everyone chooses or is able to use all of the latest technology. If you don’t have access to download numbers in any way, ensure that the school provides you with a paper log each day. They should already be producing this for internal use, so it should be no problem for them to provide a copy in your child’s backpack.

Stay in Touch: Once the school year is in full swing it’s important to stay in touch with the school. Check in and see how they feel things are going on their end. It’s also important to have good communication about any notable events that happen with your child during the school day. We already touched on how to get access to blood sugar numbers consistently, but you should also make sure to touch base regularly with the nurse to find out if they are seeing any trends outside of just numbers. Is your child needing juice more often than you realize solely based on blood sugar? Are the having to prevent highs by doing correction boluses that you aren’t noticing? As you already likely know, it is so important to know the whole picture of the day as that information helps you better manage them once they are home for the evening. Your child can help fill you in on the day as well, but sometimes their school days can become muddled (or at least it did for C), so having good communication with the school can help avoid any confusion.

Lastly, be sure to have a means of communication established for the nurse to give you notice that a particular supply is running low in your child’s diabetes supply box. A little foresight and an agreed upon communication mechanism can prevent a mad dash to the grocery store and back to the school at the last minute (speaking from experience).

While it’s never easy sending your Type 1 child back to school, or to school for the first time in Kindergarten, my hope for you is that together we can make it a little easier for everyone. I hope that you can learn from some of my mistakes (which is how I’ve built these steps over the years), and I hope to get lots of feedback from readers like you so that we can keep growing this list year-after-year.

Here are some other helpful resources to check out:

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Life Support

Life Support

It’s an indescribable feeling…holding your child’s life support from the last 6+ months.

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Genteel Lancing Device Review

Genteel Collage 1

*Screenshots taken from https://www.mygenteel.com/

You guys, I am seriously so excited to share this product with you! It is called the Genteel Lancing Device, and it is truly incredible! Ever since C was diagnosed with diabetes we have seen and explored other lancing devices that claim to be pain-free. While some hurt less than others, none have truly been pain-free. That is until they developed this device!

Genteel Collage 2

The skeptic in me felt that it was too good to be true. While C has largely gotten used to the finger pokes, they are still not pain-free. He has just accepted that this is his reality, and poking his fingers is just part of how he takes care of himself. But as a mom, obviously I don’t want him to just have to accept that, and the fact that there is a product that can eliminate one of the more painful aspects of this disease, is truly incredible!

Genteel Collage 3

First let me start by telling you a little bit about how the device works, and what sets it apart from other lancing devices. To me one of the coolest things about this device is that you can test blood from many different sites on the body- not just fingertips. You can test on the chest, upper arms, stomach, forearms, hips, fingers and palms, thighs, and calves. Having this flexibility is invaluable! You get to give those poor fingertips a break!

Another big thing that sets it apart from other lancing devices is that it uses vacuum, vibration and depth control to get the perfect drop of blood. The lancet only reaches blood capillaries and avoids hitting pain nerves all together. The diagram below perfectly demonstrates this.

Genteel Screenshot 3
Here is a picture detailing the different parts of the Genteel Lancing Device:
 
Genteel Screenshot 4
C created a video in which he demonstrates how to use the device. You can view that here.
If you are someone who retains info better by reading, here are some diagrams to walk you through prepping your Genteel, and performing a blood draw.
 
First, you need to pick your test site, then prepare the Genteel for lancing.
 
Genteel Screenshot 5
Now you’re ready to perform a blood draw.
Genteel Screenshot 6

While it does work differently than other lancet devices (therefore creating a small learning curve) C picked up how to use it after just a couple of tries.

The box also comes with a sheet of stickers you can decorate your device with. I personally love how C decided to style his.

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My only regret is not having this product earlier! I cannot imagine how nice this would’ve been to have when he was just a little toddler who despised getting his fingers pricked.

I seriously cannot say enough good things about this device. If you or your child dreads finger pokes, this device is worth every penny! If you want to try one yourself click here to purchase. Be sure to use coupon code: FINGERPRICKIN15 for $15 off! If you get one, let me know how you like it!

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20 Carb Snack Packs

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I saw the amazing idea, on a fellow D-Mom’s Instagram account (@mama_of_2_t1d_boys) to pre-measure snacks, in a pre-determined amount, and put them in little Ziploc containers, that can easily be grabbed on the go, for our kiddos with T1D.

We have built a snack into C’s morning schedule at school, because he eats lunch later this year and has P.E. and recess before lunch. We found that all that activity, combined with the increased gap in between breakfast and lunch, was causing lows before lunch (even with basal adjustments). So the snack has helped keep his numbers steadier.

I typically send him with a variety of protein/granola bars. His favorites are Quest Bars & LARABAR’s. He still loves those, but has vocalized that he could use a break from the bars. So when I saw this idea on @mama_of_2_t1d_boys account, I knew I had to replicate it! In the past I have also included other pre-packed snacks (in the 15-25 carb range) in his snack box, but I have never done this before. This method is a lot more cost effective too.

Using my food scale, I counted out some of his favorite snacks so that each container equaled exactly 20 carbs. I thought I’d keep it easy with doing all 20 carb snacks, but you could do 5, 10, 15, etc., or a combo of varying carb ranges.

Snack Bucket Collage

Here is what I put inside our containers (from left to right, starting at the top):

1) Glutino Yogurt Covered Pretzels
2) Trader Joe’s Rainbow’s End Trail Mix
3) Annie’s Homegrown Organic Chocolate Bunny Grahams
4) Annie’s Homegrown Organic Honey Bunny Grahams
5) Annie’s Homegrown Cheddar Squares
6) Annie’s Homegrown Chocolate Chip Cookie Bites
7) Trader Joe’s Organic Animal Crackers
8) Glutino Fudge Covered Pretzels
9) Boom Chicka Pop. Popcorn
10) Annie’s Homegrown Organic Cheddar Snack Mix
11) Annie’s Homegrown Cheddar Bunnies
12) Brothers All Natural Fruit Crisps

Let me know what you would put in your snack containers!

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Snow Day Recipes & Activities

5 Kid Approved & Diabetic Friendly Snow Day Snacks- Collage

Even though I am a grown woman, I still look forward to a snow day as much as my kids. As soon as I catch wind that big snow might be coming, I’m heading to the store to stock up on groceries, going through our diabetes supplies and making sure we aren’t running low on anything, and trying to plan some fun activities to do with the kids.

For those of you that are the same as me, I thought I would share some fun snow day recipes and activities to do with the kids. First up…recipes!

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These Cheese Stick Snowmen are so easy to make and a nice, fun, low carb snack. I share the instructions on how to make them on t1everydaymagic.com- Cheese Stick Snowmen.

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A super fun recipe are these Hot Chocolate Popsicles. Even though it’s a cold treat, my kids really love these! Just another fun way to enjoy hot chocolate.

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Another yummy treat is these No-Bake Fudgy Snowballs. Not only do they look fun, but they are also healthy, gluten-free, egg-free, dairy-free, and vegan. And because they are no-bake, they come together super quick!

Snow Ice Cream- 2

Ever made Snow Ice Cream before? We hadn’t until a couple of years ago and the kids absolutely loved it! So fun!

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As long as we don’t lose power in the snow storm, I also enjoy baking on snow days. These 4-Ingredient Peanut Butter Cookies, are super easy, delicious and low carb. Get the recipe over at t1everydaymagic.com- 4 Ingredient Peanut Butter Cookies.

Snow Day Collage

Some other things we enjoy doing on a snow day is of course playing out in the snow. If there is enough snow, the kids always want to build a snowman. For the past few years I had a snowman kit I had made myself out of clay, but years of wear and tear has left some of the pieces in not the greatest of shape. I found a cheap snowman kit at Target that we now use. They also sell some snow bricks that can be used to make a snow fort. Snow painting is another favorite. You just add water and some food coloring into plastic squeeze bottles (like what you would put ketchup and mustard in), and have at it.

Indoor Activities

If it’s too cold to go outside and play, there is still lots of fun to be had inside. In past years we’ve enjoyed making forts in the house. The above picture is of my middle son in a fort we made using my Moby Wrap.

My kids also love these pretend snowballs (picture borrowed from Amazon.com) for an indoor snowball fight. My mom got these for them last year, and all 3 of my kids have loved having little snowball fights year round.

Snow Day Books

With 3 kids covering a wide range of ages (almost 10, 7 & 2), it can sometimes be difficult to find activities that aren’t boring to my 9 year old, but not too involved for my 2 year old. Books have been a great way to bridge the gap. I try to sit down with them every night and read together. It’s something they all 3 enjoy, and I certainly enjoy it as well! Nothing better than having my 3 kiddos curled up next to me on the couch and reading a good book to them. Above are some of our favorite snow related books- perfect snow day reads!

Snow Day Experiments

Snow days are also a good time to do some experimenting. My kids love a good experiment. Here are some fun ones we’ve done over the years, or plan to do this year.

Here is a list of some other fun ideas: 20 Must-Try Winter Science Experiments.

How do you like to spend snow days?

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21 Months

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My daughter turns 21 months old today. To most people, this isn’t necessarily a noteworthy month (at least not more than any other), but I have found myself a bit emotional as the day approaches as she is now as old as C was when he was diagnosed with diabetes.

Nearly 8 years into this disease I feel like I have largely come to terms with what our life with diabetes looks like, and I am often “numbed out” to that raw emotion that existed for the first couple of years after his diagnosis. Some days are certainly better than others, but for the most part, I have accepted our “normal.”

However, I still have triggers that can take me back to that hospital room with my little toddler, whose only concerns at the time were making sure he had at least 5 trains by his side at all times, and that an episode of Little Einsteins was constantly playing. He had no idea why he was at the hospital, or that there was a war being waged inside his tiny body, why his tiny fingers were now being pricked multiple times a day, or why he was now given shots 4 times a day. He was completely unaware of the gravity of a diagnosis of type 1 diabetes. This is something I am thankful for, because by the time he was old enough to understand it, it was already his normal.

Because I am now dealing with a 9 1/2-year-old who is becoming increasingly more in charge of his own diabetes management, it’s easy to forget just how challenging those early days really were. But now that I look at my daughter who is now exactly the same age that he was when he was diagnosed, the memories start flooding back. Memories I have tried hard over the years to suppress.

I went through the same thing when my middle child turned 21 months old, 5 years ago. I know there isn’t a lot of logic to it, because even if my other two children were to become type 1 diabetics as well, the likelihood of that happening at 21 months would be highly unlikely.

Even so, I can’t seem to shake the emotion I am feeling. Sometimes I think I try so hard to put on a brave face, that I forget that it’s OK to feel sad, to feel angry, to feel bitter, to wish with every fiber of my being that this wasn’t C’s reality…our reality.

So instead of trying to suppress that emotion that I’m currently feeling, I’m going to try to just embrace it this month. Feel that sadness, the loss of the innocence and carefree-ness that was stripped of my firstborn at 21 month old. But also knowing, that if my other two children were to be diagnosed that we would be OK. That you can still live a full and happy life even when plagued this awful disease.

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Let’s Race!

IMG_9494A week ago this past Saturday, C & I both ran our first race together. He ran a 1 mile race and I ran a 5K. I know, I know, millions of people run this (and much much further distances) daily, and with great ease. However, for those who know me, this was a big feat for us…on many levels. I’ll get more into that in a minute.

Just a week and a half before said race, C’s soccer coach sent out a message to parents encouraging anyone interested to sign up. It had been a New Year’s resolution of mine to run a 5K this year. However, to be completely honest, at the time of the message I was doing absolutely nothing to work toward that goal. But my husband encouraged me, and said maybe this is the perfect opportunity to run your first one- C can do the 1 mile race and you can do the 5K. After much debate, I decided to go for it.

The night before, I questioned what in the world I had done. I am not a runner in any sense of the word. Heck, I had to run out and buy running shoes the week of the race, because I didn’t even own proper running shoes. On top of my own personal stress about running, I was concerned about C. What if he went low during the race? What should we feed him before to help stabilize blood sugar?

Even a year ago, had something like this come up, our immediate answer would have been “no”. It’s not worth the stress and worry of trying to navigate diabetes during a race that is just for fun. We’ll just sit this out and stay in our comfort zone, thank you very much.

Why do I tell you all this? Because by us completing our races together, something big clicked inside of me. There was a day so many things scared me about him growing up and wondering how we would navigate diabetes (school, sports, sleepovers, etc.), but all have proven to go far better than I could have ever imagined. And while diabetes does certainly add an extra layer of planning and stress to a lot of these activities, do know they are possible and that your type 1 kiddo can do absolutely anything and everything that non type 1 kiddos can do. Don’t let diabetes be a reason you say “no” to something. I say this, because I’ve been guilty of this before.

So I guess the moral of the story is this…those big scary things that intimidate you and you think you/your child could never do. Do them.

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Newly Diagnosed Meal Plan

For the last couple of months I have been working with Beyond Type 1 to create a 1-week meal plan for a newly diagnosed family. This is something I have been wanting to do for awhile. Every time I hear from a newly diagnosed family, I’ve wanted to have something to direct them toward that will help them get back on their feet and learn how to prepare meals for their type 1 kiddo.

This plan features some of our favorite family recipes, and when creating it, I tried to strike a balance of low carbohydrate options, while also keeping them super kid-friendly, as this will likely be a new way of eating for many kids.

This plan contains options for a homemade breakfast, lunch, snack and dinner, every day for a week. If this is an overwhelming amount of cooking for you, feel free to pick and chose from the recipes provided- you can totally cater it to your own family. The plan is merely meant as a sample week.

BT1 4 Favorites Collage

Here are 4 of our family favorite recipes that are included in the plan:

Low Carb Breakfast Burritos Over the years these Breakfast Burritos have become a favorite at our house! They’re so easy to make and so delicious! I promise you won’t even miss the tortilla!
Unwrapped Sandwich Skewer Sometimes you just need a break from an ordinary sandwich. This Unwrapped Sandwich Skewer does just that! Just load up a popsicle stick or skewer with your favorite sandwich fillings and you have a perfect lunch idea. If your kiddo doesn’t typically eat sandwiches, this may be just the ticket to getting them to like them!
Chickpea Cookie Dough Dip Whenever I make this Chickpea Cookie Dough Dip, my kids are always left begging for more. I know that a chickpea based cookie dough dip may have you raising your eyebrows, but I’m here to tell you that this stuff is goooood and it totally tastes like cookie dough!
Broccoli Slaw Spaghetti After looking for a low-carb alternative to spaghetti, this delicious Broccoli Slaw Spaghetti was born. You’ll be shocked at what a “noodle fix” broccoli slaw will give you!

For the whole plan click here. While there, be sure to check out all of Beyond Type 1’s amazing resources. Their “First 30 Days” section is especially helpful for newly diagnosed families.

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